Places

GOA
Tour Intro

We are the authorised agent of Goa Tourism Development Corporation Ltd.

Goa is a holiday paradise on India's west coast. Come to Goa for an Indian Holiday and you won't be disappointed. Goa has something to offer every tourist. If its sun, sand and sea that you're looking for, Goa's got it all in abundance. Miles of golden sandy expanses stretch along the west coast of India, beside the Arabian Sea. The rolling waves wash the beaches of Goa, on which sunbathers, holiday travelers and the local residents of Goa relax and have the time of their lives.

Goa is a holiday paradise on India's west coast. Come to Goa for an Indian Holiday and you won't be disappointed. Goa has something to offer every tourist. If its sun, sand and sea that you're looking for, Goa's got it all in abundance. Miles of golden sandy expanses stretch along the west coast of India, beside the Arabian Sea. The rolling waves wash the beaches of Goa, on which sunbathers, holiday travelers and the local residents of Goa relax and have the time of their lives.

Goa, India, is famous the world over for the unique charm of its beaches. The famous beaches Calangute, Miramar, Dona Paula, Agonda, Aguada, Benaulim and Colva to name a few, were sought after by hippies and flower children in the 1970's. Today Goa's beaches attract international tourists who seek a place to relax and unwind in the sunny weather of Goa, India.

The dance parties on the beaches and the carnivals and festivals in Goa provide many occasions for party lovers to dance and have fun to their hearts content. If its history and culture that interests you, Goa has many historic churches and colonial buildings. Panaji the capital of Goa has lots to offer a tourist with an interest in history and architecture. The colonial monuments built by the Portuguese in Goa, make a fascinating tour. With fabulous beaches, cultural attractions and warm and friendly people, there can no better place than Goa for your Indian Holiday.

Tourist attractions in Goa are globally famous. Everyone knows Goa tourist attractions are its sunny golden beaches. But beaches are not the only tourist attraction of Goa. Goa is an old city having its own traditions, culture, architecture and its share of monuments. Goa is studded with churches all over due to its past of foreign connection. There is galore of tourist attractions in Goa. There are beaches; temples, churches and villages are not to be forgotten.

Places of Interest
Panaji

It is the capital of Goa and has many tourist attractions of Goa. It is situated on the banks of River Mandovi. Panaji has many renowned Churches and buildings built in Gothic style. The must see of the Panaji are the Chapel of St. Sebastian, The church devoted to our Lady of Immaculate Conception, the Goa State Museum, the Secretariat building, the statue of Abbe Faria.

Old Goa
Old Goa is the home of many old and famous churches. Convent and Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Church of St. Cajetan, Church of St. Augustine Ruins, Church and Convent of St. Monica, Church of Our Lady of Rosary, Chapel of St. Anthony and Chapel of St. Catherine are among the those old churches. The holy Basilica of Bom Jesus is a famous pilgrimage for Roman Catholics.
Mahalaxami Temple
It is the very famous place of worship for Hindus in Goa devoted to Goddess Laxami, goddess of wealth.
Mangeshi Temple
It is the very famous temple of Goa. Se Cathedral: Very good example of Portuguese-Gothic architecture. It is known to be the largest church in Goa.
Beaches of Goa
The major tourist attractions of Goa are its beaches. The Calangute, Fort Aguada beach, Vagatore beach, Anjuana beach, Baga beach, Candolim beach, Vasco Da Gama beach, Bogmalo beach, Colva beach, Dona Paula beach, Miramar beach, Majorda beach, Varca beach are the most frequently visited by the tourists and the local both. Another tourist attraction of Goa is its festive life. Evening cruises in Mandovi River with local songs, exotic Goan seafood, and the Goan festivals are the add-ons of the tourist attractions in Goa.
Margao

It is a typically crowded Goan town, with chaotic, noisy traffic and quite a few architectural reminders of its Portuguese past. Margao is Goa's second largest town and a bustling commercial centre.

Surrounded by fertile farmland, the town of Margao was once a major religious centre, with dozens of wealthy temples and dharmshalas (dormitories). In fact the name Margao is thought to be the Portuguese corruption of the word Mathgram (from Math - a Hindu religious centre that used to exist there) However most of these were destroyed when the Portuguese absorbed the area into their Novas Conquistas during the 17th century.

Margao has an old-worldly charm about it because of its Portuguese churches, and some magnificent specimens of old Portuguese houses complete with shady balcaos (porches) and oyster-shell windows in its Borda area.

The Largo de Igreja, or the Church of the Holy Spirit as it is also known, dominates the entrance to the city, just north of the Municipal Garden square. The church area is surrounded by beautiful old residential houses still in pristine condition. The church was built by the Portuguese in 1675 and is one of the finest examples of late-Baroque architecture in Goa, boasting a pristine white façade and an interior dripping with gilt crystal and stucco.

Just within walking distance of the Church, is the famous "House of Seven Gables" or "Sat Burzam Ghor". This magnificent mansion was commissioned in 1790 by Sebastino da Silva, emissary and private secretary of the Portuguese Viceroy. Although only three of the seven gables remain today, they are enough to give the visitor an idea of the size of the original edifice.

The town has an excellent market area stretching from the south edge of the main square to within a stone's throw of the old railway station. The Bazaar centres on a labyrinthine covered area that's a rich source of authentic souvenirs and a good place to browse for some bargain shopping.

In the centre of the town is the Municipal Garden (known as Praça Jorge Barreto), around which most restaurants and office buildings are located. The colonial style red washed Municipal building built in 1905 and the Library lie on the park's south side. From this main square, bylanes lead to the bazaar and the area that used to be the fish market.

Margao's fish market was earlier located opposite the Municipal building and was a spectacular sight, with the fisherwomen from coastal areas of South Goa hawking their wares at the top of their voices, dressed in superbly coloured cotton sarees. The market has since been shifted to a complex located at the entrance of the city.

The road from the Largo de Igreja splits into two at the entrance to Margao, one going into the city proper and the other winding up towards towards another Margao landmark. This road called Calçada de Nossa Senhora de Piedade leads up to Monte Hill. There is a small chapel at the top of the hill which remains locked most of the time. But it is worth coming up here for a spectacular view of the Salcette countryside in general and Margao in particular.

The famous Colva beach is just 6 kms away from Margao, so most travellers coming to this area of Goa, tend to spend their time in the beach area, rather than enjoy the charms of Margao town itself.

There are some interesting places around Margao. About 3 Km. from the small village of Raia, which is on the road from Margao to the Borim bridge, is the Rachol Seminary and Church. Margao is also the last stop for a number of trains coming to Goa especially from Mumbai.

Vasco-da-Gama

It is 30 kms. from Panaji. A modem, well laid out city close to Mormugs Harbour, has beautiful and extensive avenues. The air terminus of Goa at Dabolim lies on the outskirts of the city. It is also the railway terminus for passenger service in the South Central Railway.

Vasco

The area came under Portuguese rule around 1543, and within a few years, it was transformed into one of western India's busiest ports. The Portuguese built a fort at Sada, near the tip of the land jutting into the Arabian sea. This allowed them to effectively control the movement of ships into the Zuari river.

The fort had its most glorious moment in 1685, when Old Goa came under attack from King Sambhaji of the Marathas and the Portuguese moved women, children and other non-combatants here for safe keeping. The fort was abandoned soon after, despite plans to make Mormugao the capital of the Portuguese colony of Goa, and today only some remnants of the ramparts can be seen.

At the base of the ruins of Sada fort, there is a small but beautiful beach which can be reached via steps leading down the steep cliffside. The beach remains pretty isolated fro most of the day except for a few locals who venture down for a dip in the sea. There is also a fresh-water spring in the hillside which has a constant flow of water round the year.

The main town of Vasco is well laid out pretty much in a straight line along parallel roads interlinked by small bylanes. There is hardly any landmark worth making a visit to Vasco, except for the 400-year old St. Andrews Church which lies at the entrance to the city. In recent times, the city has been attracting local visitors, to what is easily the best cinema theatre in the whole of Goa.

The port of Mormugao, around one of India's few natural harbours, lies 4 kms from the city centre and the only airport in the state, the Goa Airport at Dabolim, is also about 4 kms from the city. Vasco also has a railway terminus for passenger trains to nearby areas outside Goa and more importantly a daily service which takes tourists to the magnificent Dudhsagar waterfalls near the state border.

There are two beaches near the city. The bigger and the more famous is the Bogmalo beach which is about 8 kms south-east of the town and the smaller one named Hollant lies just about halfway along the same road. Bogmalo beach has luxury and mid-range hotels in the neighbourhood along with quite a few shacks where you can sample some tasty sea-food dishes.

Along this same road to the Bogmalo beach is located the Naval Air Museum, the only one of its kind in the whole of Asia. It has on display, some of the fighter aircraft which have done duty for India in its conflicts with the enemy.

Vasco-da-Gama is a key shipping centre, very important for the economy of Goa, which has a large number of mines in its interiors. The Mormugao port handles heavy traffic of container vessels and iron ore barges carrying ores and minerals to countries such as Japan and Korea.

Pilar

It is 11 kms. from Panaji. It has important religious and educational centre of Christian Missionaries. The Church, Seminary and School atop hillock command a magnificent panorama of the country side around and a fine view of Mormugao Harbour & Zuari river.

Come and Enjoy Goa

Goa is a holiday paradise on India's west coast. Come to Goa for an Indian Holiday and you won't be disappointed. Goa has something to offer every tourist. If its sun, sand and sea that you're looking for, Goa's got it all in abundance. Miles of golden sandy expanses stretch along the west coast of India, beside the Arabian Sea. The rolling waves wash the beaches of Goa, on which sunbathers, holiday travelers and the local residents of Goa relax and have the time of their lives A company vehicle is available for emergencies.

If its history and culture that interests you, Goa has many historic churches and colonial buildings. Panaji the capital of Goa has lots to offer a tourist with an interest in history and architecture. The colonial monuments built by the Portuguese in Goa, make a fascinating tour. With fabulous beaches, cultural attractions and warm and friendly people, there can no better place than Goa for your Indian Holiday. The dance parties on the beaches and the carnivals and festivals in Goa provide many occasions for party lovers to dance and have fun to their hearts content.